Katakuchi Chawan

    Katakuchi Chawan

    Price: $60.00

    25 available for immediate delivery

    Quantity in Cart: None

    青嶋利陶作 志戸呂焼 片口茶碗
    Shitoroyaki "Katakuchi Chawan"
    Artist: Rito Aoshima
    Made in Shizuoka, Japan

    The Katakuchi Chawan solves the problem faced when you want to prepare matcha the traditional way, but you want to transfer the matcha into smaller cups or into another container. With a traditional chawan, the matcha will not pour easily, and there is generally much matcha wasted that runs down the face of the bowl and spills in the process. The Katakuchi Chawan allows you to whisk your matcha properly, and then pour cleanly into another vessel (great for sharing matcha with friends!).

    The Katakuchi Chawan can also be used as an elegant yuzamashi (water-cooling pot). Simply pour hot water into the Katakuchi Chawan, allow it to cool to your desired temperature, and then pour into your teapot.

    *This item is an original work of art. Each piece may will differ very slightly in glaze strokes.

    About the Artist: Rito Aoshima (青嶋利陶) is a 2nd generation potter, whose father started the current studio in which he works. The studio was created to revitalize the Shitoro-Yaki style and preserve its over 900 year history. The kiln was built as a Noborigama (rising kiln), which has multiple levels staggered vertically to achieve an extremely hot firing temperature. Rito Aoshima studied pottery in Seto (a famous location for pottery), before returning to Shizuoka to study in the Shitoro-Yaki style. Later, he has assumed his father’s studio and kiln, and continues to make teaware for tea ceremony, as well as other vessels with a focus on elegance.

    About the Shitoro-Yaki style: Shitoro-Yaki (志戸呂焼) refers to the pottery style of a small region in southwest Shizuoka Prefecture, dating back to the 12th Century. The center of this style is a town formerly known as Kanaya (金谷), which is also the home of Sugimoto Headquarters. Clay from this area is high in ferric oxides, represented by yellowish and reddish hues in the clay and glazes. Pottery in this style often showcases the color and character of this clay, encouraging us to appreciate rustic simplicity and focus on the subtleties that make everything unique. Kobori Enshu, a tea master in the Edo Period (17th Century), loved Shitoro-Yaki and certified it as one of the “Enshu Nana Kama” (7 pottery-styles of Enshu).